Apps Making Driving Safer

Every day new technology is made for the express purpose of making people safer. This is especially true in the car industry, where safety is paramount – and the definition is constantly shifting.

Most recently, a new trend has been popping up in the auto industry. There are now dozens of apps out there to help people drive more safely. These apps are great for teenagers and adults alike and are available on multiple platforms. 

SafeDrive

SafeDrive is the perfect app for anyone actively trying to limit their phone usage while driving. SafeDrive is an app that believes phones can be a dangerous distraction in the car and works to reward drivers for keeping their phones away when behind the wheel.

LifeSaver

While LifeSaver is targeted more towards teen drivers (or, more accurately, the parents of teen drivers), this is an app for anyone. LifeSaver combines GPS monitoring with a rewards system similar to that of SafeDrive. Parents can track their teens and help reward them for keeping their phones safely tucked away. 

DriveMode

DriveMode is very similar to the apps mentioned above in that it discourages distracted driving by reducing phone use. DriveMode silences call, alerts, and texts while driving. Additionally, it can send out auto-replies in the meantime, so there is no need to worry about a lack of response on the driver’s part.

Inrix

Inrix doubles as a safety and map app. It learns from users’ driving habits, creating individualized routes that help avoid traffic. The goal is to keep drivers focused on the road and not figure out how to get from A to B.

Mojo

Mojo is another monitoring app, but with a twist. Mojo monitors user driving statistics and rates them according to how safe their driving is. The app allows users to accumulate points, which eventually begin to earn gift cards as physical rewards.

iOnRoad

iOnRoad is an innovative new app that takes full advantage of today’s technology. It uses augmented reality to map out the other cars on the road and will send automatic alerts when your vehicle gets too close to another.

EverDrive

Are you feeling a bit more competitive about safe driving? EverDrive is the perfect app for that. EverDrive rates users on their safe driving by monitoring acceleration, braking, and speed. From there, it provides total scores, which can be shared with the neighborhood.

Racing to the Future: Automotive Trends for 2030

It’s time for the automotive industry to start looking ahead. With all of the advancements in technology cropping up every day, now is the time to begin imagining what trends await the market for 2030.

The automotive industry has always had a talent for keeping up with technology. It has seamlessly integrated luxury items such as cameras, BlueTooth speakers, and lidar technology for comfort and safety.

Part of staying current with the trends involves the ability to look ahead. One has to imagine what the trend will be to have a design ready for that demand. As such, there are already dozens of predictions out there for what 2030 has in store.

It is entirely likely that by the year 2030, there will be a different power source available for automobiles. The demand for alternatives is already there. Just look at the prevalence of hybrid and electric vehicles. That demand is likely to rise over the next decade, resulting in a new breed of cars.

Likewise, the drive to create autonomous vehicles is still going strong. Yes, this industry has hit a few roadblocks over the last couple of years, but consumer interest is still there. While not every car will be autonomous by 2030, some experts believe that as many as 15% might be.

It is expected that the average customer will have changed by 2030 as well. Not everyone will want or need to own a car then. Cars will be seen as a mobility function, used primarily for commuting, trips, and errands. In turn, it is believed that sharing and rental cars will become more common in the following decades.

To keep up and partially counter this demand, companies will have to grow and adapt. They can either go with the flow by investing in rental opportunities. Or they can begin creating specialized cars to entice the remaining buyers’ market. 

Regarding the potential clients out there, experts believe that by the year 2030, every person will have 15 connected devices. Think TVs, smartphones, wearable devices, appliances, digital assistants, and security devices. 

This trend towards new connected devices will likely be reflected in the auto industry as well. Like current devices, they will be expected to eventually integrate with the cars considered more desirable.

The Best New Tech Safety Features in Cars

There has been a steady influx of tech features being rolled out by car manufactures, and 2021 is going to be no different. Any new automobile technology’s primary goal, regardless of its purpose for comfort, safety, or entertainment, is to avoid driver distraction. Here are some of the highest-rated safety tech features in cars for 2021.

 

Teen drivers are still the riskiest group on the roads and also the biggest worry for parents. With Chevy’s Teen Driver, parents can stay connected via a system that alerts when the car is driven over a speed limit, or the forward collision alert is triggered. They are also provided with a safety report card. Buckle to Drive is a feature of GM’s Teen Driver car system and displays notifications about safety. It also provides parents with a driver’s report card. 

 

Digital car keys have now become a valuable tool in automotive safety. The ability to start a car remotely is not only luxurious and convenient, but it reduces the amount of time a person has to wait to get inside and lock the doors. The proactive gauges that monitor fuel levels and tire pressure cut down drastically on the possibility of becoming trapped in a dangerous situation or breaking down. The future will see smartphones acting as remote keys. 

 

One of the most annoying and dangerous car elements is the blind spot caused by side pillars. New technology includes blind-spot sensors and monitors. Mounted on either the side or rear of the car, they can detect when vehicles are approaching and send either visual or audio alerts. Brands like Kia and Hyundai provide this feature within the gauge cluster, which keeps the driver focused on the road. 

 

Humans are slowly warming up to the concept of having driver-assisted technology. Some co-pilot packages offer hands-free driving, automated parking, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, reverse brake assist, and Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB). Faster than a human’s ability to respond, AEB will also brake harder if danger seems imminent. This revolutionary safety feature The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) believes AEB, dynamic brake support (DBS), and crash imminent braking (CIB) will be the most significant developments in the fight against traffic fatalities. 

Will Car Safety Tech Lower Insurance Rates?

With the rise of more technologically advanced cars comes the expectation of safety. Many new features in vehicles, such as collision avoidance and parking assistance, are designed to help make the driving experience a safer one.

With the increase in safety comes the assumption that there will be a decrease in car insurance costs. However, it is never safe to make any assumptions in the world of insurance, and thus it is essential to research the matter.

Car Safety Tech

Every single year new advancements are made in the world of technology. Much of the new technology developed for automobiles has been to make travel safer for all. There’s no doubt that self-driving cars will come around, eventually. In the meantime, here are plenty of innovations to bridge the gap.

Collision warning systems are a common piece of car safety tech. Other features can include automatic emergency braking, lane-keeping assist, 360-degree camera, blind-spot monitoring, pedestrian detection, cabin camera, and adaptive headlights. 

Tech Effectiveness

The latest Consumer Reports indicate strongly that the latest advancements in car safety technology do work as intended. They prevent collisions or reduce the severity of them when unavoidable.

Naturally, this means that lives can be saved and injuries avoided. However, there is a negative worth discussing at this point. Much of the technology available today is hidden behind increased expenses. A car with additional features is not as affordable as a more basic model, so it will not apply to everyone.

Technology vs. Human Error

While it is true that technology has been working hard to make driving a safer experience for all, there are some mitigating factors to consider. According to recent research, human driving has been getting worse, even while the technology gets better.

Bobbie Seppelt, from MIT, has been studying part of this phenomenon since 2015. The study has focused on driver attention and has found that distracted and multitasking drivers have become more common.

Furthermore, the study found that when car safety tech is at play, there are two types of users. First, there are the people who trust the tech, sometimes even going so far as to experiment with it or even rely on it too heavily. Conversely, some may outright stop using the technology.

Car Insurance And Technology Costs

While these advancements in car safety tech meet their intended goals – to save lives – they do so at an increased cost. This, in turn, makes it more expensive for insurance companies to replace.

It doesn’t take much to realize where this train of thought is leading. With the new technology costing more for insurers to replace, there is little incentive to decrease insurance plans. 

For example, The Zebra pointed out that a regular bumper would cost between $300 and $700 to replace, with a bumper with sensors would cost more than $1,000 to replace. When looking into how much is saved, it turns out that the average car safety tech can only save around 1% on car insurance. Perhaps this is something that will change in the future, as care safety tech and insurance companies learn to work together.