The Learning Curve for New Car Tech

Who doesn’t love to buy a car with all of the newest gadgets and tech? Unfortunately, doing so does come with a bit of a learning curve, especially for those that aren’t quite so technologically savvy.

Here’s the good news: cars, on the whole, are designed to be user-friendly. This means that they are designed under the assumption that most people will thoroughly learn to operate their car, all gadgets included. Though for some, this may take longer than others.

Increase In Tech Means Increased Learning Curve

The fancier a car’s tech gets, the longer it will take the average customer to understand it. Still, many consider this a small price to pay for increase comfort, convenience, and safety. Again, the price is sometimes higher for others.

Voice commands can be tricky, especially for anybody with an accent – or even a voice pitch outside of the program’s parameters. This makes people feel like they aren’t understood or represented and can even discourage them from using the tech again.

Likewise, pairing phones and other devices to cars can sometimes be easier said than done. This will vary dramatically based on the vehicle and even the phone model, making it impossible to create a comprehensive guide for all.

Creating Something Familiar

Naturally, car companies don’t want to create cars that people don’t like or want to use. Thus, it’s their job to make this newly emerging technology as approachable as possible. For some, that means emulating standard technology.

New dashboards and panels in cars are beginning to look more and more like phones. This allows for the maximization of information transfer while also providing the users with something they already know how to operate: their phone.

Tips to Adapt

When buying a new car full of tech and gadgets, there are certain tricks users can employ to work through that learning curve at a faster rate. First, it’s essential to keep an open mind. Don’t jump into the car expecting to have a bad experience and hate the tech – that will become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Next, start small. Try pairing your phone to the car. Once done, you’ll now be able to safely talk on the phone and choose your music – which may just help your mood as well! 

It’s also essential to take your time adjusting to new technology, so don’t pressure yourself. Or the car, for that matter. And finally, don’t be afraid to access the owner’s manual if you’re stuck. If you find yourself having trouble after that, the dealership or even the internet can be a beneficial resource.